Arcticportal News
CNARC Fellowship program launched
Other News
Written by Magdalena Tomasik   
Wednesday, 30 April 2014 09:38

(Photo: Hjalti Þ. Hreinsson) Chinese researchers from the Snow Dragon during their visit in Iceland (Photo: Hjalti Þ. Hreinsson) Chinese researchers from the Snow Dragon during their visit in Iceland The China´s Nordic Arctic Research Center (CNARC) fellowship program has just been launched.

 

The program offers opportunities for excellent researchers from both China and Nordic states, under the collaborative framework of the CNARC, to conduct join research within leading research organizations in Arctic studies.

 

The program allows researchers to advance their own research projects while contributing to an increased awareness, understanding and knowledge of the Arctic and its impacts for both China and the Nordic states.

 

More detailed information about the fellowship is available here. Click here to download the application form.

 

The China-Nordic Research Center (CNARC) was established in Shanghai on 10th December 2013 by 10 Member Institutes, four Chinese and six Nordic, which all have capacities to influence and coordinate Arctic research.

 

CNARC's purpose is to provide a platform for academic cooperation to increase awareness, understanding and knowledge of the Arctic and its global impacts, as well as to promote cooperation for sustainable development of the Nordic Arctic and coherent development of China in a global context.

 

 

 

 
IASC new president elected
Other News
Written by Magdalena Tomasik   
Tuesday, 29 April 2014 09:25

(Photo: IASC) IASC Executive Committee at the meeting in Helsinki 2014 (Photo: IASC) IASC Executive Committee at the meeting in Helsinki 2014During the Arctic Science Summit Week that took place in Helsinki, IASC Council elected a new president and three vice presidents.

 

The elections took place 8th of April.

 

The new IASC President is Susan Barr, Norwegian Directorate for Cultural Heritage. Susan Barr has been working on the IASC Executive Committee as a Vice-President since 2010 and she is now taking over the Presidency from David Hik whose 4-year term came to an end. David Hik will, however, continue to work with the Executive Committee in his function as the Chair of the 3rd International Conference on Arctic Research Planning (ICARP III). IASC Council re-elected Vice-President Naja Mikkelsen, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, for another 4 years.

 

Larry Hinzman, International Arctic Research Center, Fairbanks AK, and Vladimir Pavlenko, Russian Academy of Sciences, were elected new Vice-Presidents.


The Executive Committee is complemented by the fourth Vice-President Huigen Yang, Polar Research Institute of China, and the Executive Secretary Volker Rachold.

 

Click here to go the IASC website.

 
Sustainable Fishing in the Arctic: seminar
Other News
Written by Magdalena Tomasik   
Monday, 28 April 2014 09:27

(Photo: Getty Images) (Photo: Getty Images) May 7th 2014 the North Norway European Office organizes the high level seminar entitled: ´´Sustainable fishing in the Arctic´´. The event will take place in Norway House in Brussels at 10 – 12.15 am. The seminar is open for public.


The seminar will explore the potential of marine resources for Europe. The emphasis will be on the developments in the Arctic and the potential in European funded research for sustainable e exploration of marine fishing resources.


The key speakers will include Sigurður Ingi Jóhannsson – Icelandic Minister of Fisheries and Agriculture, Amund Drønen Ringdal – State Secretary, Norwegian Ministry of Trade, Industry and Fisheries and Bernhard Friess – Director of Atlantic, Outermost Regions and Arctic, DG MARE, European Commission.


The seminar in Brussels is organized by North Norway European Office, in collaboration with Mission of Norway to the European Union and Norwegian Ministry of Trade, Industry and Fisheries.


Click here to read more and to register for the event.

 
Arctic sea ice at fifth lowest annual maximum
Climate Change News
Written by Magdalena Tomasik   
Friday, 25 April 2014 09:23

(Image: NSIDC) Arctic sea ice extent for March 2014 was 14.80 million square kilometers (5.70 million square miles). The magenta line shows the 1981 to 2010 median extent for that month. The black cross indicates the geographic North Pole. (Image: NSIDC) Arctic sea ice extent for March 2014 was 14.80 million square kilometers (5.70 million square miles). The magenta line shows the 1981 to 2010 median extent for that month. The black cross indicates the geographic North Pole.Arctic sea ice reached its annual maximum extent on March 21, after a brief surge in extent mid-month. Overall the 2014 Arctic maximum was the fifth lowest in the 1978 to 2014 record. Antarctic sea ice reached its annual minimum on February 23, and was the fourth highest Antarctic minimum in the satellite record. While this continues a strong pattern of greater-than-average sea ice extent in Antarctica for the past two years, Antarctic sea ice remains more variable year-to-year than the Arctic.


Arctic sea ice extent for March 2014 averaged 14.80 million square kilometers (5.70 million square miles).

 

This is 730,000 square kilometers (282,000 square miles) below the 1981 to 2010 average extent, and 330,000 square kilometers (127,000 square miles) above the record March monthly low, which happened in 2006. Extent remains slightly below average in the Barents Sea and the Sea of Okhotsk, but is at near-average levels elsewhere.

 

Extent hovered around two standard deviations below the long-term average through February and early March.

 

The middle of March by contrast saw a period of fairly rapid expansion, temporarily bringing extent to within about one standard deviation of the long-term average.

 

Source: National Snow & Ice Data Center
 
Russia to expand the ice - breaking powers
Other News
Written by Magdalena Tomasik   
Wednesday, 23 April 2014 08:41

(Photo: Getty Images)Challenging weather conditions increase the need for more icebreakers in Russian waters. (Photo: Getty Images)Challenging weather conditions increase the need for more icebreakers in Russian waters. The Russian Federation national nuclear corporation Rosatom has been very close to reaching the deal with United Shipbuilding Corporation on the construction of two powerful icebreakers.


After long negotiations, the two of the biggest Russian state enterprises are about to find a compromise on the ice – breaker deal.


The Russian national newspaper Kommersant reported, that two LK-60 icebreakers, the powerful 60 MW vessels, will be built at the Baltiisky Yard in Sankt Petersburg for a price 2 billion rubles. A part of the deal is an enhanced level of control over expenses from the side of Rosatom.


So far, the Russian federal government has allocated a total of 86,1 billion roubles for the project. However, Rosatom insisted that the two vessels should cost only 77,5 billion, an offer which was declined by the Baltiisky Yard. A second tender with an adjusted starting price of 84,4 billion roubles was announced in December 2013.

 

According to Kommersant, this is the final price which has now been agreed by the sides.


The new icebreakers will be the most powerful in the world and are key instruments in Russia's enhanced activity level in the Arctic.

 

Click here to read more about Rosatom.

 
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