Arcticportal News
Abnormal heat in Svalbard
Climate Change News
Written by Administrator   
Monday, 02 April 2012 10:30

119647770 SmallThe temperatures in Svalbard this year have been abnormal. The average temperature in the first three months of the year is around -13°.

Now it has been around -2°, 11° above the normal number. But the inhabitants have also experienced record heat, avalanches, rain and ice-free fjords.


The warmest day so far this year was February 8, with +7°C. Longyearbyen has had 90 millimeters of precipitation so far this year, nearly twice the normal.


But this is nothing compared to Ny-Ålesund, where 97 percent of the normal annual precipitation came during the first 80 days of the year.

 
Over 600 Anglers rescued in Russia
Other News
Written by Administrator   
Monday, 02 April 2012 10:29

104933589 SmallOver 600 anglers, fisherman who were angling through the ice, have been rescued after an ice sheet broke off. The Russians were not harmed.

The emergencies ministry said that 48 people were involved in the rescue operation, two helicopters and 11 ships weere used to fetch the people of the moving ice sheet.

Fishing through bore-holes on ice-bound waters is a popular winter pastime in Russia.

Taymuraz Kasayev, of the emergencies ministry, said the area's residents had been told to stay away from the ice.

"We warned people through the media that going out on to the ice on this stretch of the coastline is extremely dangerous and is not allowed," he told the NTV television channel.

One of the rescued anglers, Vladimir Vasilenko, said he had ventured on to the ice floe knowing that the windy conditions might pose a risk.

"The wind was blowing from the shore, and it was clear that something might happen, but people were still going out, so we did too," he said.

"It was the excitement, of course. We also heard on the radio that it would be the last chance for fishing on the ice. And so we rushed out to go fishing."

 
NASA research plane in the Arctic
Climate Change News
Written by Administrator   
Monday, 02 April 2012 10:25

89614807 SmallNASA has sent an Earth Resources (ER-2) high-altitude science aircraft to Iceland to study the Greenlandic ice-sheet.

The specially designed aircraft will carry out research for about 4 weeks in the high North. It will be based in Keflavík International Airport in Iceland.

A statement from the US embassy of Iceland details the purpose of its mission:

"The mission will assist global warming research by developing better methods to measure the melting of the ice in Polar regions. The ER-2 aircraft will fly high-altitude missions over Greenland in April to test the accuracy of a newly developed laser, the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experiment Lidar, or MABEL. The laser simulates a similar instrument planned for NASA's IceSat-2 environmental satellite scheduled for launch in 2016."

According to NASA, this is a part of a much larger mission called Operation IceBridge. Conducted in the Arctic in March and April and the Antarctic during October and November, NASA says, the mission is "the largest survey of Earth's polar ice ever flown."

The plane is a science laboratory in the air. It routinely flies around 70.000 feet and above, twice the height of a regular commercial airplane.

NASA ER-2s have played an important role in Earth science research because of their ability to fly into the lower stratosphere at subsonic speeds, enabling direct stratospheric sampling as well as virtual satellite simulation missions. The aircraft's unique capabilities enable studies such as stratospheric ozone concentrations over Antarctica and the Arctic.

 
Over 600 Anglers rescued in Russia
Old News
Monday, 02 April 2012 08:35
Angling is popular in Russia (Photo: GettyImages)Angling is popular in Russia (Photo: GettyImages)Over 600 anglers, fisherman who were angling through the ice, have been rescued after an ice sheet broke off. The Russians were not harmed.

The emergencies ministry said that 48 people were involved in the rescue operation, two helicopters and 11 ships weere used to fetch the people of the moving ice sheet.

Fishing through bore-holes on ice-bound waters is a popular winter pastime in Russia.

Taymuraz Kasayev, of the emergencies ministry, said the area's residents had been told to stay away from the ice.

"We warned people through the media that going out on to the ice on this stretch of the coastline is extremely dangerous and is not allowed," he told the NTV television channel.

One of the rescued anglers, Vladimir Vasilenko, said he had ventured on to the ice floe knowing that the windy conditions might pose a risk.

"The wind was blowing from the shore, and it was clear that something might happen, but people were still going out, so we did too," he said.

"It was the excitement, of course. We also heard on the radio that it would be the last chance for fishing on the ice. And so we rushed out to go fishing."


Source:

  • BBC
  • NTV television channel

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{mosmap address='Sakhalin Island, Russia'|zoom='3'|}

 
NASA research plane in the Arctic
Old News
Monday, 02 April 2012 08:19
Satellite image of the Arctic (Photo: GettyImages)Satellite image of the Arctic (Photo: GettyImages)NASA has sent an Earth Resources (ER-2) high-altitude science aircraft to Iceland to study the Greenlandic ice-sheet.

The specially designed aircraft will carry out research for about 4 weeks in the high North. It will be based in Keflavík International Airport in Iceland.

A statement from the US embassy of Iceland details the purpose of its mission:

"The mission will assist global warming research by developing better methods to measure the melting of the ice in Polar regions. The ER-2 aircraft will fly high-altitude missions over Greenland in April to test the accuracy of a newly developed laser, the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experiment Lidar, or MABEL. The laser simulates a similar instrument planned for NASA's IceSat-2 environmental satellite scheduled for launch in 2016."

According to NASA, this is a part of a much larger mission called Operation IceBridge. Conducted in the Arctic in March and April and the Antarctic during October and November, NASA says, the mission is "the largest survey of Earth's polar ice ever flown."

The plane is a science laboratory in the air. It routinely flies around 70.000 feet and above, twice the height of a regular commercial airplane.

NASA ER-2s have played an important role in Earth science research because of their ability to fly into the lower stratosphere at subsonic speeds, enabling direct stratospheric sampling as well as virtual satellite simulation missions. The aircraft's unique capabilities enable studies such as stratospheric ozone concentrations over Antarctica and the Arctic.


Source:

See Also:


Click here to enter the Arctic Portal News Portlet

{mosmap address='Keflavik, Iceland'|zoom='3'|}

 
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