Arcticportal News
Climate Change Article Test
Climate Change News
Written by Administrator   
Tuesday, 27 March 2012 09:08

clocktestFrom the outset, Krafla was in the public eye in Iceland, with much political controversy surrounding its construction. For a while it was uncertain whether Krafla would ever actually enter operation, when large-scale volcanic eruptions started only two kilometres away from the station, posing a serious threat to its existence.

Work continued, however, and the station went on stream early in 1977. Krafla‘s colourful history makes it one of the best-known power stations in Iceland. An average of 15 employees work at the station, plus site maintenance teams in summer.

From the outset, Krafla was in the public eye in Iceland, with much political controversy surrounding its construction. For a while it was uncertain whether Krafla would ever actually enter operation, when large-scale volcanic eruptions started only two kilometres away from the station, posing a serious threat to its existence.

Work continued, however, and the station went on stream early in 1977. Krafla‘s colourful history makes it one of the best-known power stations in Iceland. An average of 15 employees work at the station, plus site maintenance teams in summer.

 
Energy News Article Test
Energy News
Written by Administrator   
Tuesday, 27 March 2012 09:07

keytestFrom the outset, Krafla was in the public eye in Iceland, with much political controversy surrounding its construction. For a while it was uncertain whether Krafla would ever actually enter operation, when large-scale volcanic eruptions started only two kilometres away from the station, posing a serious threat to its existence.

Work continued, however, and the station went on stream early in 1977. Krafla‘s colourful history makes it one of the best-known power stations in Iceland. An average of 15 employees work at the station, plus site maintenance teams in summer.

From the outset, Krafla was in the public eye in Iceland, with much political controversy surrounding its construction. For a while it was uncertain whether Krafla would ever actually enter operation, when large-scale volcanic eruptions started only two kilometres away from the station, posing a serious threat to its existence.

Work continued, however, and the station went on stream early in 1977. Krafla‘s colourful history makes it one of the best-known power stations in Iceland. An average of 15 employees work at the station, plus site maintenance teams in summer.

 
Abnormal heat in Svalbard
Old News
Monday, 26 March 2012 09:29
Measuring tools in the Arctic (Photo: GettyImages)Measuring tools in the Arctic (Photo: GettyImages)The temperatures in Svalbard this year have been abnormal. The average temperature in the first three months of the year is around -13°.

Now it has been around -2°, 11° above the normal number. But the inhabitants have also experienced record heat, avalanches, rain and ice-free fjords.

The warmest day so far this year was February 8, with +7°C. Longyearbyen has had 90 millimeters of precipitation so far this year, nearly twice the normal.

But this is nothing compared to Ny-Ålesund, where 97 percent of the normal annual precipitation came during the first 80 days of the year.

Source:

See Also:


Click here to enter the Arctic Portal News Portlet

{mosmap address='Longyearbyen, Svalbard'|zoom='3'|}

 
Shipping News Article Test
Shipping News
Written by Administrator   
Monday, 26 March 2012 00:00

TesttestFrom the outset, Krafla was in the public eye in Iceland, with much political controversy surrounding its construction. For a while it was uncertain whether Krafla would ever actually enter operation, when large-scale volcanic eruptions started only two kilometres away from the station, posing a serious threat to its existence.

Work continued, however, and the station went on stream early in 1977. Krafla‘s colourful history makes it one of the best-known power stations in Iceland. An average of 15 employees work at the station, plus site maintenance teams in summer.

From the outset, Krafla was in the public eye in Iceland, with much political controversy surrounding its construction. For a while it was uncertain whether Krafla would ever actually enter operation, when large-scale volcanic eruptions started only two kilometres away from the station, posing a serious threat to its existence.

Work continued, however, and the station went on stream early in 1977. Krafla‘s colourful history makes it one of the best-known power stations in Iceland. An average of 15 employees work at the station, plus site maintenance teams in summer.

 
New drill for permafrost in Svalbard
Old News
Friday, 23 March 2012 08:18
Permafrost core (Photo: Hanne Christiansen - UNIS)Permafrost core (Photo: Hanne Christiansen - UNIS)The PAGE21 project, a new EU 7th framework collaborative research project which Arctic Portal prodly is a part of, will expand knowledge of permafrost in the Arctic. Drilling starts next week in Adventdalen, Svalbard.

A total of 18 institutions from 11 countries are involved and UNIS is in charge of the field campaign in Adventdalen outside Longyearbyen that starts next week.

The five main research field sites are Zackenberg in North Eastern Greenland, Abisko in Northern Sweden, Adventdalen and Ny-Ålesund in Svalbard, and Samoylov Island and Kytalyk in Russia. The individual key field research sites are collecting field data on the permafrost, such as determining its temperature, its amount of ice, the origin of the ice, and the distribution of permafrost landforms in the study areas.

A new specially designed hydraulic drill rig has been  bought for drilling. UNtil now the drilling has been hand made, down to only 2 meters. The new drill is able to collect cores from the permafrost in both sediments and bedrock down to potentially 50 m depth.

The drill in testing in Svalbard (Photo: Hanne Christiansen - UNIS)The drill in testing in Svalbard (Photo: Hanne Christiansen - UNIS)The drilling that starts next week will collect up to 110m of permafrost coresfrom ice-wedge polygons, pingos and solifluction sheets in Adventdalen.

The PAGE21 project combines field measurements of permafrost processes, pools, and fluxes, with remote sensing data and global climate models at local, regional and, for the first time, pan-Arctic scales.

The output from this research will help to advance our understanding of permafrost processes at multiple scales, resulting in improvements in global numerical permafrost modelling and the ensuing future climate projections.


Source:

See Also:


Click here to enter the Arctic Portal News Portlet

{mosmap address='Adventdalen, Svalbard'|zoom='3'|}

 
<< Start < Prev 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 Next > End >>

Page 54 of 115

News Feeds

media bw

arcticdata bw

publications bw

International Polar Year The Northern Forum University of the Arctic Arctic Council International Arctic Science Comittee Norðurslóðanetið

Arctic Portal - info(at)arcticportal.org - designed by Teikn Design

Tel: (+354)4612800