Arcticportal News
No radioactive materials leaked after fire
Old News
Friday, 30 December 2011 13:43
Photo of the fire from Blogger51.Photo of the fire from Blogger51.No radioactive materials leaked from the nuclear submarine Yekaterinburg who cought fire yesterday. The submarine was in a floating dock whick caught fire.

Helicopters and boats were used to put out the massive fire which could be seen miles away.

Russian oficcials say that no real danger was in place of radioactive materials leaking. The reactors were shut down before the ship docked and all missiles were removed.

Nine people were sent to a local hospital with injuries because of the massive smoke.

The naval yard is located in a close military area. The nearby city of Severomorsk is the headquarters of the Russian Northern fleet.


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{mosmap address='Severomorsk, Russia'|zoom='3'|tooltip='Severomorsk where the headquarters of the Russian Northern fleet are.}

 
Russian fishing vessel freed from ice
Old News
Wednesday, 28 December 2011 13:33
Sparta in the ice. (Photo from Reuters video)Sparta in the ice. (Photo from Reuters video)The Russian fishing vessel Sparta is free from the ice which held the ship for nearly two weeks.

The 48-metre (157-feet) Sparta, with a crew of 32, had been anchored to the Antarctic ice shelf around 2,000 nautical miles (3,700 km) southeast of New Zealand after ice ripped a hole in its hull and it started taking on water on Dec 15.

The ship will be escorted to open water where it will meet its sister ship.

No heavy fuel leaked from the ship, only a small amount of light hydrolic oil.

Here is a video from Reuters where the ship is shown, and its repairs as well.





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{mosmap address='Antarctica'|zoom='1'|tooltip='The Russian fishing vesse Sparta'}

 
Western Greenlands melts fast
Old News
Wednesday, 28 December 2011 12:48
greenland bradnun3 The annual melt season in days. Click to enlarge (Image: NOAA) The annual melt season in days. Click to enlarge (Image: NOAA)The melting of the Greenlandic glacier is rapid. The record of 2010 was not broken this year, yet it was over the long term average melt.

The National Oceanic and Athmospheric Administration (NOAA) has compiled the melting days in an image which shows where the melting occurs.

Melting was exceptionally high over the western mid-elevations, and the map shows the area swathed in orange.

In some places, the melt season lasted up to 30 days longer than average (the top of the scale corresponds to anomalies 25 days or more), and it affected 31 percent of the ice sheet surface, making 2011 one of just three years since 1979 where melt area exceeded 30 percent.

According to the Arctic Report Card, ice mass loss from Greenland in 2011 was about 430 gigatons, enough ice to raise global sea level by just over 1 millimeter.







 
CrySat to enhance marine safety
Old News
Tuesday, 27 December 2011 09:56
Here is a demonstration of the measurement of sea level. Information from CryoSat is combined with other satellites to get the measurements (Credit: CSIRO - D. Griffen)Here is a demonstration of the measurement of sea level. Information from CryoSat is combined with other satellites to get the measurements (Credit: CSIRO - D. Griffen)The European Space Agency will use its powerful satellite for monitoring weather conditions to enhance marine safety. This will benefit the Arctic as the CryoSat is designed for measuring thickness of ice.

ESA's CryoSat mission has been gathering detailed information on the thickness of Earth's ice since its launch in 2010. Through international collaboration, this state-of-the-art mission will broaden to monitor the weather.

With the satellite scientists now have data to research and conclude about the understanding of the relationship between ice, climate and sea level.

The CryoSat moves from pole to pole and will now measure the measure the sea level and the height of waves.

From February this new technology will start for this important work which will benefit throughout the world.

The image on the right shows mweasurments of sea level, when tested near Australia. The green is 0 but the yellow to red is high and light blue to dark blue belov sea level.















 
Merry christmas from the Arctic Portal
Old News
Friday, 23 December 2011 07:56
The Arctic Portal team sends its season greetings to its readers and followers wherever they may be in the world. Have a very merry christmas.

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