Arcticportal News
Interview with Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson
Climate Change News
Written by Magdalena Tomasik   
Wednesday, 24 April 2013 11:55

(Photo: Lögfræðingur) Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson, the President of Iceland (Photo: Lögfræðingur) Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson, the President of Iceland

Yesterday, 23rd of April 2013, Lögfræðingur, a peer-reviewed law journal of the University of Akureyri, published the interview with the President of Iceland – Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson.

 

Ólafur has been a vigorous advocate for peaceful and democratic evolution in the Arctic. He maintains that Iceland has a critical role within the cooperation of nations in the Arctic.

 

Ólafur emphasizes that the evolution of the Arctic must be fundamentally based on science.

 

Lögfræðingur met the President on 7 February 2013 at his residence Bessastaðir to discuss Arctic issues, Arctic development and the nature of the management and legal framework that is the key to cooperation between the Arctic countries.

 

Click here to download the article.

 

 

 

LOCATION

{mosmap address='Ny Akureyri, Iceland' |zoom='1'|}

 
Why´s this year´s spring so cold?
Climate Change News
Written by Magdalena Tomasik   
Wednesday, 24 April 2013 09:22

Most of the Arctic states (Photo: nsidc.org) The warming Arctic is give Europe and North America cold springs. (Photo: nsidc.org) The warming Arctic is give Europe and North America cold springshave already welcomed spring. Majority of them, have only seen it on the calendar as temperatures have been staying on the negative side of a meter. Why hasn´t a spring truly arrived yet?

 

Climatologists blame an unprecedented melting of Arctic sea ice. According to their research it is the reason for this year's extraordinary cold spring weather in northern Europe and North America.

 

A massive high pressure has been stable over major parts of the northern hemisphere weeks longer than normal, while the traditional warm winds from the Atlantic Sea have been absent. The consequence has been temperatures far below the seasonal average.

 

The reason for the trend is the powerful warming and subsequent ice melting in the Arctic, researchers believe.

 

While northern Europe this spring has experienced cold and dry weather, North America has had low temperatures and late snow. Figures from the Norwegian Meteological Institute show that southern Norway in the period January-March had average temperatures between 2-4 degrees below normal. Northern Norway, meanwhile, had temperatures significantly above the average and snow and rain in abundance.

 

Data from National Snow and Ice Database suggest that the Arctic sea ice extent in March 2013 averaged 15.04 million square kilometers (5.81 million square miles). This is 710,000 kilometers (274,000 square miles) below the 1979 to 2000 average extent, and 610,000 square kilometers (236,000 square miles) above the record low for the month, which happened in 2006. Continuing a trend in recent winters, ice extent was near or below average levels throughout most of the Arctic, with the exception of higher extent in the Bering Sea.

 

 

 

 
China plans to invest in Russia
Shipping News
Written by Magdalena Tomasik   
Tuesday, 23 April 2013 11:08

(Photo: Getty Images) (Photo: Getty Images) Chinese investors are interested in building deep water harbor in Arkhangelsk Oblast, according to Deputy Governor of the region. It is believed that a new deep water harbor is the natural ending point of the infrastructure development around the area.

 

Alsufyev and Dmitry Deart, who is Head of the Department for Transport, have just returned from China, where they took part in the third meeting in the joint Russian-Chinese working group on the Belkomur project.

 

They presented the deep-water harbor project to Chinese investors, who showed "principal interest" in developing the port of Arkhangelsk, the regional administration's web site reads.

 

The planned deep-water port in Arkhangelsk, which is included in Russia's transport strategy for the period to 2030, will have an annual capacity of 30 million tons.

 

 

 

LOCATION

{mosmap address='Ny Arkhangelsk, Russia' |zoom='1'|}

 
April Arctic sea ice below average
Climate Change News
Written by Magdalena Tomasik   
Sunday, 21 April 2013 20:50

(Photo: NSIDC)  Arctic sea ice extent for March 2013 was 15.04 million square kilometers (5.81 million square miles). The magenta line shows the 1979 to 2000 median extent for that month(Photo: NSIDC) Arctic sea ice extent for March 2013 was 15.04 million square kilometers (5.81 million square miles). The magenta line shows the 1979 to 2000 median extent for that monthArctic sea ice extent in March 2013 averaged 15.04 million square kilometers (5.81 million square miles). This is 710,000 kilometers (274,000 square miles) below the 1979 to 2000 average extent, and 610,000 square kilometers (236,000 square miles) above the record low for the month, which happened in 2006.

 

Continuing a trend in recent winters, ice extent was near or below average levels throughout most of the Arctic, with the exception of higher extent in the Bering Sea.

 

The Arcic sea ice is one of the key symbols of the cold and barren Arctic Region. It affects lives of both, Arctic and non – Arctic residents.

 

The Arctic sea ice significantly contributes to the world weather patterns and it helps to keep the globes temperatures down.

 

The measurements that have been conducted for the past six years show that the Arctic sea ice has been decreasing. Scientists predict that this pattern will lead to the ice – free Arctic before 2050.

 

Click here to find daily reports on Arctic sea ice. To read more about the Arctic sea ice, climate change and more, please access the Arctic Portal Climate Change & Sea Ice Portlet.

 

 

LOCATION

{mosmap address='Ny Bering Sea' |zoom='1'|}

 
Treaty for the Arctic?
Other News
Written by Magdalena Tomasik   
Friday, 19 April 2013 10:11

The sea divided into east and west. Click to enlarge (Map by Arctic Portal) The sea divided into east and west. Click to enlarge (Map by Arctic Portal)

Diplomats and fisheries officials from five Arctic states will meet in Washington later this month to discuss regulations on commercial fishing near the North Pole.

 

Government representatives from five Arctic states, i.e. Norway, Denmark, Canada, United States and Russia, agreed yesterday to meet later this month in order to discuss the laws that will apply to commercial fishing within the Arctic Circle.

 

About 70 percent of the world's total white fish supply comes from Arctic waters. This marine resource is extremely significant to Arctic regional and coastal communities.

 

Fishing in the Circumpolar North has been and is a significant economic resource. Fishing is also rooted in the culture of many of the Arctic nations.

 

Click to enlarge. (Graph by Arctic Portal - Numbers from Statistics Iceland) Click to enlarge. (Graph by Arctic Portal - Numbers from Statistics Iceland)

Now Exclusive Economic Zones divide where nations can catch fish but this economic activity has shaped the cultural values in the Arctic and is an important factor in the daily life of the coastal residents.

 

 

If an agreement is made, it will represent the third such accord struck by countries in the far north to manage the commercial development and industrialization of the region, which is expected to increase with global warming. The other two agreements reached so far regulate oil spill response and search and rescue.

 

 

The 12th Conference on Polar Meteorology and Oceanography that will take place in Seattle, Washington on 29th of April, is sponsored by the American Meteorological Society and organized by the AMS Polar Meteorology and Oceanography Committee.

 

This year it will treat not only about natural science but also serve as a place to discuss legal and political issues between Arctic stakeholders.

 

 

 

LOCATION

{mosmap address='Ny Seattle, United States' |zoom='1'|}

 
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